Agile

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  • Scrum Pictionary

    Scrum Alliance RSS Feed
    12 Sep 2014 | 8:54 pm
    "A picture is worth thousand words" --  this proverb triggered me to come up with a simple pictorial view to depict the Scrum framework in a funny yet meaningful way . . .
  • Agile Tools - Tom Perry: From Bankruptcy to Abundance

    Scrum Planet - Agile Software Development Project Management Feeds aggregator
    21 Sep 2014 | 7:58 pm
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  • Webinar: DevOps for Agility

    Agile Development Blog: Scaling Software Agility
    Rally Software
    4 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Today’s fast-moving markets expose threats and opportunities at every turn. Whether you’re a large enterprise or a small startup, it’s no longer enough to simply practice Agile development. To survive — and thrive — in this disruptive environment, you need agility throughout your organization. Join Rally and Chef for a webinar about the role of DevOps in building agility and responsiveness. Learn more about how Rally practices continuous deployment, accelerates application development, and tightens customer feedback loops. Hear how you can institutionalize DevOps and use Chef…
  • Release Planes versus Release Trains

    All About Agile | Agile Development Made Easy!
    Derek Huether
    21 Sep 2014 | 2:49 am
    There is a lot of talk these days about SAFe.  I have a lot of respect for what Dean Leffingwell has done but there is a minor use of language that has been bugging me in recent days. Just as I disagree in using farm animals to describe people on a Scrum team, I believe […] The post Release Planes versus Release Trains appeared first on LeadingAgile.
  • Quote of the Month September 2014

    Software Development Musings from the Editor of Methods & Tools
    The Editor
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:36 am
    The important thing is not your process, the important thing is the process for improving your process. Source: Henrik Kniberg, http://blog.crisp.se/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/20130820-What-is-Agile.pdf
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    Agile Development Blog: Scaling Software Agility

  • Agile Volunteering, Rally Style

    Geri Mitchell-Brown
    11 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Rally Onboarding Bootcamp: Class of June 2014 “Rally truly practices what it preaches. Volunteering at There With Care touched my heart and made me proud that the company I work for is helping such a wonderful organization. It was amazing how we pulled together as a team and incorporated our Agile training from earlier in the day into our give-back project.” — Terri Barrowcliff, Customer Relationship Manager, Rally Onboarding Bootcamp, June 2014 During my first year at Rally, we’ve experienced exciting growth as a company. When I started in August 2013, we had about 400 people…
  • Management Tips from Waffle's Andrew Homeyer

    Andrew Homeyer
    9 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    This post, an interview between Grokky co-founder Dan Abdinoor and Rally engineer Andrew Homeyer, originally appeared at the Grokky blog on September 8. Andrew is product lead and engineering manager of Waffle, a Rally Innovation Labs project created in 2013. Andrew currently manages a team of six and his manager is Rally’s Chief Technology Officer.  Dan: Andrew, please introduce yourself! Andrew: I’m an intrapreneur and engineer. As for titles I sometimes go by Chief Waffle Maker. In truth, I balance my time between leading the team building Waffle.io and…
  • Webinar: DevOps for Agility

    Rally Software
    4 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Today’s fast-moving markets expose threats and opportunities at every turn. Whether you’re a large enterprise or a small startup, it’s no longer enough to simply practice Agile development. To survive — and thrive — in this disruptive environment, you need agility throughout your organization. Join Rally and Chef for a webinar about the role of DevOps in building agility and responsiveness. Learn more about how Rally practices continuous deployment, accelerates application development, and tightens customer feedback loops. Hear how you can institutionalize DevOps and use Chef…
  • Value Management: Building the Right Thing

    Catherine Connor
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    In our pursuit of portfolio-level agility, and with capacity management well-covered in our capacity planning blog series, it's time to start talking about value management. More and more companies realize that focusing on cost savings alone is no longer good enough in today’s fast-paced world. In a competitive landscape where customers have many more options and smaller startups can easily disrupt giants, we need to shift to a value-focused mindset to remain competitive. Value management in a portfolio context refers to strategic business value (more than the aggregate value of a…
  • Principle #5 of Capacity Planning: Tolerance for Incomplete Data

    Brent Barton
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The first four Principles of Capacity Planning start us on a planning journey to run a business more effectively. Here are the topics we’ve covered so far: The Team as the Resource Unit Getting forecasting efforts Roughly Right Matching Supply to Demand Using a Continuous Planning Cadence This post addresses the value of tolerating incomplete data in portfolio planning -- a principle that applies to both demand and supply. Here are some specific examples for each. Demand Tolerance: Detail Initiatives Only As You Get Close to Scheduling Them When we plan out 12 to 18 months, we’ll make…
 
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    All About Agile | Agile Development Made Easy!

  • Release Planes versus Release Trains

    Derek Huether
    21 Sep 2014 | 2:49 am
    There is a lot of talk these days about SAFe.  I have a lot of respect for what Dean Leffingwell has done but there is a minor use of language that has been bugging me in recent days. Just as I disagree in using farm animals to describe people on a Scrum team, I believe […] The post Release Planes versus Release Trains appeared first on LeadingAgile.
  • How to create an Agile Burn-Up Graph in Google Docs

    Kane Mar
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:01 pm
    A Burn-Up graph is simply a stack graph showing the total amount of work the team has in their product backlog over a number of Sprints. I’ve used a variety of different Agile Burn-Up graphs over the years. Here’s one of my favourites:     I created this with Excel while working with an insurance […]
  • How to Enable Estimate-Free Development

    Dave Rooney
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:49 am
    Most of us have been there... the release or sprint planning meeting to goes on and on and on and on. There is constant discussion over what a story means and endless debate over whether it's 3, 5 or 8 points. You're eventually bludgeoned into agree...
  • The ScrumMaster is Responsible for What Artifacts?

    Mishkin Berteig
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Learn more about our Scrum and Agile training sessions on WorldMindware.comOrganizations like to have clear role definitions, clear processes outlined and clear documentation templates.  It’s just in the nature of bureaucracy to want to know every detail, to capture every dotted … Continue reading →
  • Telling Executive Stories

    Richard Hensley
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    Delivery teams manage and deliver value supported by the tool user stories. These teams tell stories about who, what, why, and acceptability using standard form, “As a <persona>, I want <capability> so that <delivered value> occurs,” and behavior acceptance form, “Given < context>, when <action occurs>, then < consequence >.” These stories form the foundation […] The post Telling Executive Stories appeared first on LeadingAgile.
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    Scrum Alliance RSS Feed

  • Scrum Pictionary

    12 Sep 2014 | 8:54 pm
    "A picture is worth thousand words" --  this proverb triggered me to come up with a simple pictorial view to depict the Scrum framework in a funny yet meaningful way . . .
  • Has Scrum Killed the Business Analyst?

    1 Sep 2014 | 9:50 pm
    The Scrum framework does not recognize the role of business analyst (BA). However, this should not be seen as a conspiracy against BAs. . . .
  • IT Business Analysts in Scrum

    31 Aug 2014 | 1:08 pm
    During one of my first projects as a new ScrumMaster, I was asked to interview for an IT business analyst for my team. My product owner's office was ten feet away from the team, so we were colocated with the product owner and I did not have need for a business analyst. . . .
  • Distributed Retrospectives

    28 Aug 2014 | 2:15 pm
    When people are distributed geographically across various locations, doing the inspect-and-adapt cycle, i.e., the retrospective ceremony of the sprint, becomes a bit challenging. . . .
  • Linking Project Management Methods and Frameworks

    27 Aug 2014 | 9:07 pm
    There are various project management methods, such as PMP, Prince2, Lean, Lean Six Sigma (DMAIC), Agile, etc. . . . This article outlines the similarities and potential linkages between the methods at a high level so that a project can deliver the best output (and outcome).
 
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    WordPress Tag: Agile

  • Works in Progress

    Yves Zieba
    21 Sep 2014 | 8:47 pm
    via InfoQ http://www.infoq.com http://bit.ly/1ucod73
  • SCRUM and IT Companies

    lindameade123
    21 Sep 2014 | 8:47 pm
    Scrum is recent project management methodology that has taken the industry by storm. Many companies especially the IT and ITES bases organizations are taking to Scrum in a big way. Let’s look at some of the advantages of Scrum: It saves a lot of time and money for the company on a whole This methodology is especially invaluable where the business requirements of the clients are not very specifically defined in the beginning Highly technical and latest developments can be easily and quickly coded using this methodology Very lightly controlled methodology which relies on frequent and constant…
  • How Netflix Leverages Multiple Regions to Increase Availability: An Active-Active Case Study

    Yves Zieba
    21 Sep 2014 | 8:47 pm
    via InfoQ http://www.infoq.com http://bit.ly/1ucocQO
  • Planning Poker

    aleemaparker
    21 Sep 2014 | 8:47 pm
    Accurately estimating timelines and manpower requirements for delivery of solution is a critical aspect of any company to be able to ensure a great project delivery experience for a client. However, estimates are not accurate and the accuracy of the estimates varies with project complexity, team size, team availability, team priority, requirements volatility etc. Scrum tries to ensure better estimation by using methods that involve the team and use relative comparison methods. Planning Game: Scrum Poker is a consensus-based technique for estimating, used to estimate effort or relative size of…
  • The Agile Team and what is a Backlog?

    ahanaz
    21 Sep 2014 | 8:47 pm
    The Agile Team The Agile Team is something that is called cross functional. That means that the team does not only consist of only developers or only the leader board of the company, or only the marketing people. Instead, an Agile team has representatives from all departments. There are several roles in an Agile team, some of those roles are: The Product Owner: Decides which features should be in the product and represents the customers and users of the product. The Scrum Master: Makes sure everyone else on the team have the tools they need in order to progress. The Scrum Master works to…
 
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    Managing Product Development

  • Change is Learning: No Silver Bullets or Quick Fixes

    Johanna Rothman
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:33 am
    Way back when I was a developer, my professors taught me structured design and design by contract. Those were supposed to be the silver bullets for programming.  You see, if you specified things enough, and structured things enough, everything would all work out. I thought I was the only idiot that structure and specification didn’t work for. Why did I have to iterate and increment? At my first job, we had design reviews and code reviews. I learned a lot. I worked on a government contract, and the government mandated those reviews. They were useful, and they were supposed to be a…
  • Projects Where You Can’t Predict an End Date

    Johanna Rothman
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:50 am
    Do you have projects where you can’t predict an end date? These tend to be a job search, a change project, and with a tip of the hat to Cesar Abeid, your life. I like to call these “emergent” projects. You might prefer to call them “adaptable” projects, but to me, every project has to be adaptable. These projects are emergent. You need to plan, but not too much. You need to replan. You need to take advantage of serendipity. My column this quarter for projectmanagement.com is Applying Agile to Emergent Projects. (Free registration required.) Enjoy!
  • Cost, Value & Investment: How Much Will This Project Cost? Part 2

    Johanna Rothman
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    This post is continued from Cost, Value & Investment: How Much Will This Project Cost, Part 1 We’ve established that you need to know how much this project will cost. I’m assuming you have more than a small project. If you have to estimate a project, please read the series starting at Estimating the Unknown: Dates or Budget, Part 1. Or, you could get Essays on Estimation. I’m in the midst of fixing it so it reads like a real book. I have more tips on estimation there. For a program, each team does this for its own ranked backlog: Take every item on the backlog and…
  • Cost, Value & Investment: How Much Will This Project Cost? Part 1

    Johanna Rothman
    9 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    I’ve said before that you cannot use capacity planning for the project portfolio. I also said that managers often want to know how much the project will cost. Why? Because businesses have to manage costs. No one can have runaway projects. That is fair. If you use an agile or incremental approach to your projects, you have options. You don’t have to have runaway projects. Here are two better questions: How much do you want to invest before we stop? How much value is this project or program worth to you? You need to think about cost, value, and investment, not just cost when you…
  • Managers Manage Ambiguity

    Johanna Rothman
    28 Aug 2014 | 8:47 am
    I was thinking about the Glen Alleman’s post, All Things Project Are Probabilistic. In it, he says, Management is Prediction as a inference from Deming. When I read this quote, If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process, you don’t know what you’re doing. –Deming I infer from Deming that managers must manage ambiguity. Here’s where Glen and I agree. Well, I think we agree. I hope I am not putting words into Glen’s mouth. I am sure he will correct me if I am. Managers make decisions based on uncertain data. Some of that data is predictive…
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    NOOP.NL

  • The Results of My First OKRs (Running)

    Jurgen Appelo
    22 Sep 2014 | 3:41 am
    A popular topic in the new one-day Management 3.0 workshop is the OKRs system for performance measurement. (See Google’s YouTube video here.) Instead of explaining what OKRs are, I will just share with you the result of my first iteration. If you read this, you will get the general idea of how the OKRs system works. The post The Results of My First OKRs (Running) appeared first on NOOP.NL.
  • 3 Questions for Peter Morville about Intertwingled

    Jurgen Appelo
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:42 am
    Recently, I read the book Intertwingled, by Peter Morville. I liked it a lot! This was my tweet-size review: Loved the stories and insights. It’s not only about information. It’s about life. Peter’s book raised a few questions for me, and I decided to ask Peter for the answers. The post 3 Questions for Peter Morville about Intertwingled appeared first on NOOP.NL.
  • Write a Tagline – Win a Book!

    Jurgen Appelo
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:11 am
    We recently improved the story that explains what Happy Melly is all about. We’re curious what you think! Read the story, and email your summary in 10 words or less to info@happymelly.com (deadline is Saturday, 20 September). We’ll put the taglines to a vote! Two winners will be chosen: most popular and Happy Melly choice. Winners will receive a copy of the eBook “Introduction to Agile Methods” authored by Sondra Ashmore & Kristin Runyan – and donated generously by InformIT! The post Write a Tagline – Win a Book! appeared first on NOOP.NL.
  • Why I Changed the Title of My New Book

    Jurgen Appelo
    11 Sep 2014 | 9:48 am
    #WorkoutThe original title of my new book was Management 3.0 Workout. It was the result of a long and challenging process in which I learned that readers of my newsletter liked the Management 3.0 brand and also the workout metaphor that I used in many of my articles and chapters. So, why did I change it to #Workout for the Amazon Kindle edition? The post Why I Changed the Title of My New Book appeared first on NOOP.NL.
  • Define Your Target Audience

    Jurgen Appelo
    8 Sep 2014 | 6:44 am
    The big checklist that I used while writing my new book #Workout contained the following items: Remove use of the words “agile” and “lean” Remove use of the words “software” and “development” Remove use of the words “Scrum” and “Kanban” The post Define Your Target Audience appeared first on NOOP.NL.
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    Mike Cohn's Blog - Succeeding With Agile

  • Don’t Equate Story Points to Hours

    mike@mountaingoatsoftware.com
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    I’ve been quite adamant lately that story points are about time, specifically effort. But that does not mean you should say something like, “One story point = eight hours.” Doing this obviates the main reason to use story points in the first place. Story points are helpful because they allow team members who perform at different speeds to communicate and estimate collaboratively. Two developers can start by estimating a given user story as one point even if their individual estimates of the actual time on task differ. Starting with that estimate, they can then agree to…
  • The Main Benefit of Story Points

    mike@mountaingoatsoftware.com
    9 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    If story points are an estimate of the time (effort) involved in doing something, why not just estimate directly in hours or days? Why use points at all? There are multiple good reasons to estimate product backlog items in story points, and I cover them fully in the Agile Estimating and Planning video course, but there is one compelling reason that on its own is enough to justify the use of points. It has to do with King Henry I who reigned between 1100 and 1135. Prior to his reign, a “yard” was a unit of measure from a person’s nose to his outstretched thumb. Just imagine…
  • Story Points Are Still About Effort

    mike@mountaingoatsoftware.com
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Story points are about time. There, I’ve said it, and can’t be more clear than that. I’ve written previously about why story points are about effort, not complexity. But I want to revisit that topic here. The primary reason for estimating product backlog items is so that predictions can be made about how much functionality can be delivered by what date. If we want to estimate what can be delivered by when, we’re talking about time. We need to estimate time. More specifically, we need to estimate effort, which is essentially the person-days (or hours) required to do…
  • The Agile Household: How Scrum Made Us a Better Family

    mike@mountaingoatsoftware.com
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:13 pm
    I’m always fascinated by stories about Scrum (or any agile process) being used outside of software development. When Martin Lapointe told me how he and his family used Scrum -- and especially a task board -- to manage their recent relocation from Paris to Montreal, I immediately asked him to share that story. I’m sure you’ll find it as interesting, amusing, and informative as I did. - Mike Cohn Ever since discovering the “Agile Manifesto,” I have been trying to integrate its core set of values into my day-to-day routines in hopes of improving processes outside of…
  • Now vs. Not-Now Prioritization Along with Medium-Term Goals

    mike@mountaingoatsoftware.com
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following was originally published in Mike Cohn's monthly newsletter. If you like what you're reading, sign up to have this content delivered to your inbox weeks before it's posted on the blog, here. In last month’s newsletter I wrote about how we make personal financial decisions in a now vs. not-now manner. We don’t map out must-haves, should-haves, could-haves, and won’t haves. And I promised in this month’s newsletter, I would cover a simple approach to now vs. not-now planning while still accommodating working toward a bigger vision for a product.
 
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    djaa.com

  • Recommendations for Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass

    David Anderson
    20 Sep 2014 | 6:55 am
    Recent attendees of the Masterclass tell you what they valued and why you should attend... David's approach to training is truly unique. I now have a different lens to view my team's upstream work, current work in progress, and deeper knowledge on how to communicate risk without disrupting the flow of changes throughout the organization.  What David has created with his, Modern Management Framework, is a revolutionary way of thinking for an evolutionary way of change. Jay Paulson   read more
  • Project Management with Kanban Class Curriculum

    David Anderson
    6 Sep 2014 | 5:49 pm
    This is the first look at one of our new role-based training classes. This is specifically targeted at project managers and related roles such as service delivery manager, program manager, and anyone with responsibility for delivering projects, product releases and similar batches of packaged creative or knowledge work. This new curriculum is scoped within the Modern Management Framework and will be available in 2-day class format at the Advanced Practitioner level with the LeanKanban University curriculum structure. Project Management with Kanban classes will be available publicly and…
  • Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass Curriculum

    David Anderson
    5 Sep 2014 | 7:10 pm
    For the first time, I'm posting our curriculum for the Kanban Coaching Professional Masterclass. This new curriculum is scoped within the Modern Management Framework and takes effect in Masterclasses offered after November 1st 2014. read more
  • LeanKanban Kanban Foundation Curriculum

    David Anderson
    4 Sep 2014 | 7:45 pm
    As part of our continuing sneak peak of the new LeanKanban Modern Management Framework, I want to show how we are using it to define and communicate the curriculum for individual training classes. We are now offering a wide range of training classes at different levels. Here we look at the 2-day Kanban Foundation level training... read more
  • Project Management with Kanban (Part 4) - Risk Review

    David Anderson
    4 Sep 2014 | 9:55 am
    This is my final blog post in the series on project management with Kanban. If you haven't seen the previous three posts read them here, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. This post looks at how project managers can help with risk management and controlling the average lead time and the the lead time distribution. This is important to insure that the forecasts described in Part 3 remain trustworthy and accurate through the duration of the project. The Blocker Clustering technique described in this post was developed by Klaus Leopold and can be used to drive process improvement as well as managing…
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    The Agile Management Blog

  • Scaling Agile Your Way: SAFe vs. MAXOS (Part 2 of 4)

    Satish Thatte
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:03 pm
    In Part 1 of this four-part blog series, I explained why a cookie-cutter approach will not work as you undertake large-scale agile initiatives.  Each agile project developing a product or a solution has a unique context:  assumptions, situation, team members and their skill sets, organizational structure, management understanding and support, maturity of practices, challenges, culture, etc. In Part 1, I proposed a fairly comprehensive list of 25 scaling agile parameters classified into six scaling aspects: 1.  Teams 2.  Customers/Users 3.  Agile Methods and Environments 4.
  • Scaling Agile Your Way: Agile Scaling Aspects and Context Matter Greatly (Part 1 of 4)

    Satish Thatte
    8 Sep 2014 | 8:16 am
    Consider these five very different types of organizations: 1.  An organization with fairly hierarchical management structure, traditional Project/Program Management Office (PMO) trying to transition from traditional waterfall development to agile development.  Some teams have just a few months of experience with Scrum, and perhaps worked with few XP or Lean practices.  Budgets are done on an annual basis.  Senior management pays lip service to agile transformation and treats agile as a silver bullet. 2.  A government contractor is used to delivering projects on a fixed-price basis.  The…
  • 7 Things I Validated in My First Month With VersionOne

    Mark Des Biens
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:05 am
    What’s your lucky number? In June, I attended the Agile West BSC/ADC conference in Las Vegas and didn’t do so well at the roulette table; however, two months later on 7/21/14 (lucky 7s) I placed an even bigger bet; not on red, but on Pantone Color Number 216. It’s the signature color of VersionOne, the all-in-one agile project management tool and services provider. After almost seven years of building up my agile acumen at Cars.com, I decided that it was time to close that season of my career, and I began researching and planning my next career challenge. I outlined three key pillars…
  • This is Way Better Than the Ice Bucket Challenge!

    Andrea Keeble
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    If you feel like there’s a lot of time being idled away on the Ice Bucket Challenge and other wacky, brainless activities, we have a better idea to spend your time. In just 10 minutes you could do something really valuable for the agile software community. But first I’m hoping to get just a tiny smile out of you by sharing something I wrote on our Product Blog earlier this week — just in case you aren’t subscribed there. If you are, just ignore this and go straight to the punch line. I posed this question: What’s the Best Way to Spend 10 Minutes? Let’s think…
  • Bouncing Agile: How Google Analytics is Related to Agile Success

    Kelly Key
    25 Aug 2014 | 12:46 pm
    It was a normal day.   I was reading articles, blogs, emails, Tweets, stories and a host of other types of information.  While perusing an item, there was an interesting link and I clicked into another Web location.  When I arrived, the newly presented topic was not what I expected so I navigated away from the site.  Little did I know, this interaction was most likely recorded by Google Analytics as a “Bounce.” Google states that, “Analytics helps you analyze visitor traffic and paint a complete picture of your audience and their needs.”  Things like Page Views, Average Time on…
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    Learn Software Development

  • User Stories: Work with the team rather than a one-man effort

    Ashish Agarwal
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:51 pm
    It has been the experience of many teams that the process of writing User Stories is mostly a one-person effort, or rather, a one-role effort. The Product Owner is the one who is expected to write the User Story (or rather, all the User Stories). If there are multiple Product Owners, then they would be expected to distribute the User Stories between them and deliver the same to the team. This has been the expectation of many teams as well – my discussion with many team members is that they expect that the Product Owner will have the entire responsibility of the User Stories. Talking…
  • Work started on a story, but constraints pop-up during the work ?

    Ashish Agarwal
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:26 pm
    This can happen fairly easily. You would think that you have planned tasks to a great degree during initial planning of these tasks, and work has started; but it is a bit impractical to think that for all tasks, the task will go fully as expected. You would come across a situation once in a while where there are new constraints that are discovered during the ongoing task, these constraints needing additional work. In other cases, the constraints were such that they needed time to resolve, before actual work could happen on resolving these constraints. In most of these cases where constraints…
  • Is the same amount of time required for Product Backlog Grooming across Sprints ?

    Ashish Agarwal
    21 Feb 2014 | 11:40 am
    So far, in previous posts, we have talked about Product Backlog Grooming primarily being used for preparing and optimizing User Stories for the upcoming Sprint. Of course, in addition, it is also used for refining the overall Product Backlog, weeding out those where it is clear that they will not make it into the product, and doing similar activities for optimizing the Product Backlog. As a result, the Product Backlog Grooming session covers both the work for the next Sprint, and also optimizing the overall Backlog. However, a lot of literature and articles focus primarily on the part where…
  • Product Backlog Grooming – Removing team suggested features

    Ashish Agarwal
    15 Feb 2014 | 1:15 pm
    One of the primary items in the Product Backlog Grooming is about having a process whereby the Product Owner and the Scrum team can get together on a regular basis for discussing the items in the Product Backlog and do some of the following: – Removes items that don’t seem relevant – Refines items based on outside information such as changed technical circumstances or industry developments – Proposed technical exploration for items that are technically complex – Looks for estimation of those tasks where the estimation can be difficult, so that such estimates are…
  • Advantage of Product Backlog Grooming – gets the team to start thinking

    Ashish Agarwal
    14 Feb 2014 | 1:08 pm
    The Product Backlog Grooming is not a process that every team goes through, and I believe that even with teams that do it, the level of detail that they follow differs from team to team. But what exactly is a Product Backlog Grooming ? Well, the Backlog Grooming is a process whereby, before the actual Sprint in which a few specific User Stories need to be taken up, the more complicated / complex of these User stories are taken up for discussions before the actual Sprint. In this way, the team and the Product Owner get into a more detailed, mutually acceptable discussion of the scope of these…
 
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    Atlassian Blogs » Blog Category » Developer

  • Playing as a team during ShipIt. The agile way.

    Ivan Loire
    16 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    Sometimes, especially under pressure, we can lose focus on what’s really important. During this ShipIt, our 24-hour hackathon, we maintained our focus on delivering the highest value first. We used agile methodologies in the most effective way we could (yes, in a period of less than 24 hours), so: The plan We had a backlog (which consisted of Post-Its on a whiteboard). Every new problem or idea went into the backlog so it could be prioritized after the current sprint. No change of priorities or scope were allowed during the current sprint. Sprints? Yes. Sprints. We did 1.5 hour…
  • 5 tips for great code reviews

    Dan Radigan
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    In almost every organization, team members collaborate to get work done. Software teams typically transition issues between people for different functions like code development, code review, and testing (even if they are all on the same team). When transitioning an issue from one team member to another it’s important to minimize the amount of ramp up required for the receiver to fully understand the issue. Transferring issues can be extremely expensive as it requires time from not only one, but two team members. Reviewing code, however, is a best practice among software teams. Code…
  • Virtual Dev Den, September 3rd

    Tim Pettersen
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Next Wednesday at 8am PDT we’ll be running our first developer “Office Hours” on a Google+ hangout. Our first session will be hosted by myself and recently elected Docker Governance Advisory Board member Nicola Paolucci. We’d love to take your questions on git, Docker, developer workflows, Atlassian developer tools or how we do development at Atlassian. For example: What are the pros and cons of instituting code review? How does a rebase work? How does Atlassian use git, Bamboo and Nexus for Continuous Deployment? You can leave any questions that you’d like us to…
  • Flux Step By Step

    Nicola Paolucci
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Facebook has recently presented a new way to compose applications, an application architecture they named Flux. They reported that as modern web applications grow in complexity, this model eases the maintenance and the cognitive load required to develop them. I jumped in excitement (it’s true!) as I immediately saw the beauty of the model. But I wanted to understand it and confirm my intuition and itch about it. I am a tinkerer at heart so with this tutorial I share my current understanding and draw some conclusions on Flux. (This material will skip some details on React, the web…
  • Pull request proficiency: Fetching abilities unlocked!

    Nicola Paolucci
    12 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    Nowadays applying a fix to a project is as easy as creating a fork – which conjures up a full remote copy of the project for you to hack on – selecting the file you want to change, pressing Edit and committing your fixes. What if you are at the receiving end of a pull request (abbreviated PR in the following) instead? Using a polished web UI is great and often that’s all you need. Click a button to Approve, click a button to Merge and you’re done. But that’s not always the case! It’s a common occurrence to have to download the changes included in a pull…
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    Agile Software Development

  • Agile Java Developer, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

    3 Sep 2014 | 8:51 am
    A leading financial software house is seeking a skilled Senior Java Developer to design and develop algorithmic trading platforms and trade execution systems. These white-label platforms are used by over 175 trading firms, including investment banks, hedge funds and asset managers around the world.
  • Scrum Master, MarketShare, Los Angeles, CA

    22 Jul 2014 | 6:32 am
    Our goal is to deliver innovative and intuitive user experience for brand marketers to make better budget allocation decisions on a day to day basis. We have created an advanced predictive analytics big data platform on the cloud that crunches large volumes of data, builds and applies models to ...
  • Enalean announces Tuleap 7

    17 Jul 2014 | 10:09 am
    Enalean, provider of Tuleap, the first Open Source Enterprise suite for Application Lifecycle Management, continues its enterprise quality 100% Open Source strategy by releasing Tuleap 7.This new release provides : Interface overhaul, Agile connector into Eclipse, Git industry-proven performance ...
  • AGILE2014 conference hosts round-table discussion with leading industry analysts

    17 Jul 2014 | 8:12 am
    Agile Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting the advancement of Agile software development principles and practices, will host an Industry Analyst Round Table at the AGILE2014 conference, featuring leading research analysts from Cutter Consortium, Gartner Research, IDC and V ...
  • Hansoft Expands Financing to $10 million with Hasso Plattner Ventures

    30 Jun 2014 | 10:44 am
    Hansoft, with its eponymous tool for team collaboration and management in Agile software development today announced it has partnered with venture capital firm Hasso Plattner Ventures to further accelerate growth worldwide.
 
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    Scrum Planet - Agile Software Development Project Management Feeds aggregator

  • Agile Tools - Tom Perry: The Values of a New Methodology: Swarming

    22 Sep 2014 | 11:34 pm
    read more
  • Scrum 4 You: Multikulti – vom Umgang mit Internationalität in Projekten

    22 Sep 2014 | 10:35 pm
    Wir reden immer davon, dass es bei verteilten, global verstreuten Teams um das Verständnis geht, dass Amerikaner eine andere Kultur als die indischen Kollegen haben (Stichwort Skalierung). Es geht also immer darum, die unterschiedlichen Nationalitäten im Blick zu haben und deren Kultur zu verstehen. Bei meiner Arbeit mit internationalen Teams bin ich zu einer anderen Schlussfolgerung gelangt: Internationale Firmen haben selbst eine Kultur. Sicher, es gibt Einflüsse – Lokalkolorit. Aber die Kultur eines Unternehmens ist viel stärker als die des Landes.read more
  • Agile Game Development : Why Agile Game Development?

    22 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    Agile is a set of values for building products, like games, more effectively by balancing planning with reality, delivering features and quality iteratively, while focusing on the emergent fun of the game by adding features and mechanics in a player-value prioritized way.  It allows a more responsive and predictable approach to development by balancing planning, art, design, technology and testing within small iterations rather than consigning much of the work in these areas to phases of development (i.e.read more
  • Scrum 4 You: Design Thinking für Product Owner: Der Design-Thinking-Prozess

    21 Sep 2014 | 10:45 pm
    Die drei wichtigen Komponenten des Design Thinkings sind das Team, der variable Raum und der Prozess. Der Design-Thinking-Prozess mag in dieser priorisierten Liste am Ende stehen, aber er ist das wohl bekannteste Element des Design Thinkings. Seine Struktur ist gut zu visualisieren und die meisten Menschen mögen klare Abfolgen, weil sie Sicherheit versprechen.read more
  • Agile Tools - Tom Perry: From Bankruptcy to Abundance

    21 Sep 2014 | 7:58 pm
    read more
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    Software Development Musings from the Editor of Methods & Tools

  • Quote of the Month September 2014

    The Editor
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:36 am
    The important thing is not your process, the important thing is the process for improving your process. Source: Henrik Kniberg, http://blog.crisp.se/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/20130820-What-is-Agile.pdf
  • Software Development Linkopedia September 2014

    The Editor
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:36 am
    Here is our monthly selection of interesting knowledge material on programming, software testing and project management.  This month you will find some interesting information and opinions about the software developer condition, scaling Agile, technical debt, behavior-driven development, Agile metrics, UX (user eXperience), NoSQL databases and software design. Blog: The Developer is Dead, Long Live the Developer Blog: Scaling Agile at Gilt Blog: Technical debt 101 Blog: Behaviour Driven Development: Tips for Writing Better Feature Files Article: Acceptance Criteria – Demonstrate Them…
  • SEMAT: The Essence of Software Engineering

    The Editor
    3 Sep 2014 | 9:37 am
    SEMAT (Software Engineering Method and Theory) is an initiative to reshape software engineering such that software engineering qualifies as a rigorous discipline. SEMAT and Essence are big thinking for software developers. There are millions of software engineers on the planet in countless programs, projects and teams; the millions of line of software that run the world are testament to their talents, but as community we still find it difficult to share our best practices, truly empower our teams, seamless integrate software engineering into our businesses, and maintain the health of our ...
  • Software Development Conferences Forecast Agust 2014

    The Editor
    28 Aug 2014 | 12:38 am
    Here is a list of software development related conferences and events on Agile ( Scrum, Lean, Kanban) software testing and software quality, programming (Java, .NET, JavaScript, Ruby, Python, PHP) and databases (NoSQL, MySQL, etc.) that will take place in the coming weeks and that have media partnerships with the Methods & Tools software development magazine. Agile on the Beach, September 4-5 2014, Falmouth in Cornwall, UK SPTechCon, September 16-19 2014, Boston, USA Receive a $200 discount on a 4 or 3-day pass with code SHAREPOINT Future of Web Apps, September 29-October 1 2014, London,…
  • Quote of the Month August 2014

    The Editor
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:55 am
    We don’t mean that you should put on your Super Tester cape and go protect the world from bugs. There’s no room for big egos on agile teams. Your teammates share your passion for quality. Focus on the teams goals and do what you can to help everyone do their best work. Source: Agile Testing, Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory, Addison Wesley
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    Agile For All

  • Looking Back at the Past Two Years

    Bob Hartman
    12 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    I want to start this post by thanking Eric Englemann (yes, that is him on the right!), the CEO of one of our awesome clients, Geonetric. Almost two years ago he took a huge risk and completely changed their corporate structure. But he didn’t stop there, he committed to letting the world know how they were doing along the way. He and others in his company have been extremely open about their results, including how they were doing one year after the big change and again last month. Well, two years ago Agile For All underwent a big change as well. It went from a single-member LLC where I…
  • Cynefin and Story Splitting

    Richard Lawrence
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:42 am
    Cynefin as of June 2014 – From Dave Snowden, released under CC BY 3.0 As I was preparing for my Agile Denver session on Unscaling, which leaned heavily on the Cynefin Framework, I reread Liz Keogh’s excellent post, “Cynefin for Devs.” I realized that I use my story splitting patterns in a few different ways depending on the domain, and I’ve never been explicit about this (which probably confuses people I’m coaching). Unless you’re already familiar with Cynefin, go read Liz’s post. I’ll wait. Here’s how story splitting looks different for each Cynefin domain:…
  • Agile Denver Session Notes: Unscaling

    Richard Lawrence
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:51 am
    For those who attended last night’s Agile Denver meetup, here are the slides and some additional resources for you… For those who couldn’t make it, my slides aren’t intended to tell the whole story on their own, but you may be able to get some value from them. The most common question I’m getting from people who see just the slides is about the source for the charts on pages 10-12. The line chart is from J. Richard Hackman and is simply math—the number of unique links between individuals in a group of size N is N(N-1)/2. My stacked bar chart was an argument…
  • Scrum Basics: When Should We Schedule Sprint Transitions?

    Richard Lawrence
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:34 am
    We’re often asked which day or days are best for scheduling the Sprint Planning, Review, and Retrospective meetings. In general, we prefer mid-week sprint transitions. People are most likely to take Monday or Friday off, so it’s easier to get the whole team reliably on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday. Having a couple days to get started with the work for a new sprint and to build some momentum is nice, so I like planning on Wednesdays. For a one week sprint, it’s possible to do Review, Retrospective, and Planning all on Wednesday morning. Or, you can do the Review and…
  • Org Structure, Software Architecture, and Cross-functional Teams

    Richard Lawrence
    9 Jun 2014 | 3:22 pm
    Just as people often look like their pets…Some 46 years ago, Melvin Conway wrote, “Any organization that designs a system (defined broadly) will produce a design whose structure is a copy of the organization’s communication structure.” This idea is known as “Conway’s Law,” and the converse is known as “Reverse Conway’s Law.” It’s as true today as it was a half century ago. The basic idea is this: Your organizational structure drives a particular software architecture. And your software architecture drives a particular organizational structure. People who work…
 
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    Agile For All » Blog

  • Looking Back at the Past Two Years

    Bob Hartman
    12 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    I want to start this post by thanking Eric Englemann (yes, that is him on the right!), the CEO of one of our awesome clients, Geonetric. Almost two years ago he took a huge risk and completely changed their corporate structure. But he didn’t stop there, he committed to letting the world know how they were doing along the way. He and others in his company have been extremely open about their results, including how they were doing one year after the big change and again last month. Well, two years ago Agile For All underwent a big change as well. It went from a single-member LLC where I…
  • Cynefin and Story Splitting

    Richard Lawrence
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:42 am
    Cynefin as of June 2014 – From Dave Snowden, released under CC BY 3.0 As I was preparing for my Agile Denver session on Unscaling, which leaned heavily on the Cynefin Framework, I reread Liz Keogh’s excellent post, “Cynefin for Devs.” I realized that I use my story splitting patterns in a few different ways depending on the domain, and I’ve never been explicit about this (which probably confuses people I’m coaching). Unless you’re already familiar with Cynefin, go read Liz’s post. I’ll wait. Here’s how story splitting looks different for each Cynefin domain:…
  • Agile Denver Session Notes: Unscaling

    Richard Lawrence
    26 Aug 2014 | 7:51 am
    For those who attended last night’s Agile Denver meetup, here are the slides and some additional resources for you… For those who couldn’t make it, my slides aren’t intended to tell the whole story on their own, but you may be able to get some value from them. The most common question I’m getting from people who see just the slides is about the source for the charts on pages 10-12. The line chart is from J. Richard Hackman and is simply math—the number of unique links between individuals in a group of size N is N(N-1)/2. My stacked bar chart was an argument…
  • Scrum Basics: When Should We Schedule Sprint Transitions?

    Richard Lawrence
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:34 am
    We’re often asked which day or days are best for scheduling the Sprint Planning, Review, and Retrospective meetings. In general, we prefer mid-week sprint transitions. People are most likely to take Monday or Friday off, so it’s easier to get the whole team reliably on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday. Having a couple days to get started with the work for a new sprint and to build some momentum is nice, so I like planning on Wednesdays. For a one week sprint, it’s possible to do Review, Retrospective, and Planning all on Wednesday morning. Or, you can do the Review and…
  • Org Structure, Software Architecture, and Cross-functional Teams

    Richard Lawrence
    9 Jun 2014 | 3:22 pm
    Just as people often look like their pets…Some 46 years ago, Melvin Conway wrote, “Any organization that designs a system (defined broadly) will produce a design whose structure is a copy of the organization’s communication structure.” This idea is known as “Conway’s Law,” and the converse is known as “Reverse Conway’s Law.” It’s as true today as it was a half century ago. The basic idea is this: Your organizational structure drives a particular software architecture. And your software architecture drives a particular organizational structure. People who work…
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    LeadingAgile

  • Release Planes versus Release Trains

    Derek Huether
    21 Sep 2014 | 2:49 am
    There is a lot of talk these days about SAFe.  I have a lot of respect for what Dean Leffingwell has done but there is a minor use of language that has been bugging me in recent days. Just as I disagree in using farm animals to describe people on a Scrum team, I believe the Release Train metaphor is dated and has its limitations. I believe, when doing Agile at scale, a Release (Jet) Plane offers a better representation of the complexity of enterprise level delivery processes. When I think of a train, I think Amtrak in the NorthEast Corridor, the DC Metro, or School House Rock.  I…
  • Telling Executive Stories

    Richard Hensley
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    Delivery teams manage and deliver value supported by the tool user stories. These teams tell stories about who, what, why, and acceptability using standard form, “As a <persona>, I want <capability> so that <delivered value> occurs,” and behavior acceptance form, “Given < context>, when <action occurs>, then < consequence >.” These stories form the foundation of repeatable delivery and management of value. While these forms support delivery team conversations well, they are inadequate to support the richer conversation needed by executives to manage…
  • Acceptance Criteria

    Steve Povilaitis
    9 Sep 2014 | 7:47 am
    Did We Build the Right Product? And, Did We Build the Product Right? Acceptance criteria are an important yet, in my experience, often overlooked or undervalued aspect of the iterative planning process. Acceptance criteria are super important because projects succeed or fail based on the ability of the team to meet their customers documented and perceived acceptance criteria. When we clearly define acceptance criteria up front, we avoid surprises at the end of a sprint, or release, and ensure a higher level of customer satisfaction.  In other words we’re able to answer these two important…
  • Don’t Estimate Stories In Sprint Planning

    Andrew Fuqua
    2 Sep 2014 | 6:46 am
    This is part three in a series on estimating. Part one was “Don’t Estimate Software Defects” and Part two was “Don’t Estimate Spikes”. I don’t estimate stories in sprint planning. Nor do I re-estimate stories in sprint planning. I estimate stories in a separate estimating meeting and usually at least a couple sprints in advance, if not more. There are a few reasons why (re)estimating during sprint planning is a dangerous practice: In sprint planning, we are thinking at a lower level of detail with far greater knowledge about the story, the code base and…
  • Flow Is For Sissies

    Andrew Fuqua
    28 Aug 2014 | 5:25 am
    Flow: Nice Work If You Can Get It A number of years ago I worked with an EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) team that was troubled with a large level of WIP (Work In Process) and slow movement of work through a system with many external dependencies. Work was regularly blocked waiting for unresponsive peers from the other companies. Work would languish in partially completed states and eventually be abandoned, either because the business relationship changed or the team gave up and turned their attention towards more likely prospects. Looked like great place to apply kanban These sounded like…
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    OutSystems Blog

  • Analyst firm IDC validates benefits of OutSystems Platform – Speed, Agility and Open Architecture

    Sean Allen
    3 Sep 2014 | 5:48 am
    Respected analyst firms like IDC have model-driven application platforms on their radar. Why? Because high-productivity application platforms like OutSystems are fundamentally changing the way IT approaches delivering innovative business solutions, like mobile and customer-facing applications. In a recent vendor profile, IDC analyzes OutSystems technology, competitive edge and market potential to help you decide if our platform is the right choice for your organization’s application development needs. Here are a few of the report’s highlights: OutSystems technology is a differentiator in…
  • VMware vCloud Air and OutSystems – Building Beautiful, Cross Platform Applications

    Sean Allen
    25 Aug 2014 | 9:16 am
    Today at VMworld, VMware introduced the expansion of its VMware vCloud® Air™ hybrid cloud platform, adding new capabilities to support mobile-cloud applications. Previously known as VMware vCloud® Hybrid Service™, vCloud Air is designed to enable enterprise and application developers to better support the dynamic needs of modern, liquid businesses. As part of today’s announcement, we are pleased to be working with VMware to provide OutSystems Platform as a solution to rapidly create, deploy and manage enterprise mobile and web applications on vCloud Air. A successful mobility program,…
  • Why the Device in Your Pocket Is Taxing the CIO

    Zahid Jiwa
    27 Jun 2014 | 6:54 am
    Business is now more global, more immediate and more mobile than ever before. Mobile technology enables employees to always be in touch with the office, the customer and the business opportunity.If I’m on a train, at a client site, working from home, or travelling between meetings, I can be as productive as if I was at my desk. But today, mobility is about much more than just communication on-the-go. It’s about technology that enables the extended enterprise to connect and collaborate, linking customers, partners and employees to valuable online information services, from any device,…
  • Best Cloud Platform as a Service – OutSystems Named Finalist for CODiE Award

    Sean Allen
    8 Apr 2014 | 4:48 am
    Last week, OutSystems was selected as a finalist for the prestigious 2014 SIIA CODiE Awards. We placed in its Best Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS) category along with several other firms, including Red Hat and NetSuite. We’re honored by this nomination and recognition. A tremendous amount of effort and ingenuity has gone into developing OutSystems Platform. Our team is among the most dedicated in the PaaS market today, working with and listening to our 350+ enterprise customers so we can continually deliver something truly remarkable – a solution that empowers them to create,…
  • Need Speed? OutSystems Boosts Performance of 1-Click Publish Feature

    Miguel Rebelo
    25 Mar 2014 | 7:26 am
    The process of continuous iteration as an OutSystems developer requires quick change and test cycles. The 1-Click Publish (1CP) operation is a core part of this process, and one that is used dozens or hundreds of times per day. Whenever you need to see the effect of changes you have done to an application, be it UI, Business Logic, Data Models, Processes, or Integrations, the OutSystems Platform lets you do that with just one click. Getting from your changes done in the model, to a fully deployed application in the cloud or across your on-premises server farm is a heavy lifting job – so…
 
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    Learn Software Development

  • User Stories: Work with the team rather than a one-man effort

    Ashish Agarwal
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:51 pm
    It has been the experience of many teams that the process of writing User Stories is mostly a one-person effort, or rather, a one-role effort. The Product Owner is the one who is expected to write the User Story (or rather, all the User Stories). If there are multiple Product Owners, then they would be expected to distribute the User Stories between them and deliver the same to the team. This has been the expectation of many teams as well – my discussion with many team members is that they expect that the Product Owner will have the entire responsibility of the User Stories. Talking…
  • Work started on a story, but constraints pop-up during the work ?

    Ashish Agarwal
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:26 pm
    This can happen fairly easily. You would think that you have planned tasks to a great degree during initial planning of these tasks, and work has started; but it is a bit impractical to think that for all tasks, the task will go fully as expected. You would come across a situation once in a while where there are new constraints that are discovered during the ongoing task, these constraints needing additional work. In other cases, the constraints were such that they needed time to resolve, before actual work could happen on resolving these constraints. In most of these cases where constraints…
  • Is the same amount of time required for Product Backlog Grooming across Sprints ?

    Ashish Agarwal
    21 Feb 2014 | 11:40 am
    So far, in previous posts, we have talked about Product Backlog Grooming primarily being used for preparing and optimizing User Stories for the upcoming Sprint. Of course, in addition, it is also used for refining the overall Product Backlog, weeding out those where it is clear that they will not make it into the product, and doing similar activities for optimizing the Product Backlog. As a result, the Product Backlog Grooming session covers both the work for the next Sprint, and also optimizing the overall Backlog. However, a lot of literature and articles focus primarily on the part where…
  • Product Backlog Grooming – Removing team suggested features

    Ashish Agarwal
    15 Feb 2014 | 1:15 pm
    One of the primary items in the Product Backlog Grooming is about having a process whereby the Product Owner and the Scrum team can get together on a regular basis for discussing the items in the Product Backlog and do some of the following: – Removes items that don’t seem relevant – Refines items based on outside information such as changed technical circumstances or industry developments – Proposed technical exploration for items that are technically complex – Looks for estimation of those tasks where the estimation can be difficult, so that such estimates are…
  • Advantage of Product Backlog Grooming – gets the team to start thinking

    Ashish Agarwal
    14 Feb 2014 | 1:08 pm
    The Product Backlog Grooming is not a process that every team goes through, and I believe that even with teams that do it, the level of detail that they follow differs from team to team. But what exactly is a Product Backlog Grooming ? Well, the Backlog Grooming is a process whereby, before the actual Sprint in which a few specific User Stories need to be taken up, the more complicated / complex of these User stories are taken up for discussions before the actual Sprint. In this way, the team and the Product Owner get into a more detailed, mutually acceptable discussion of the scope of these…
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    Boost Blog

  • Impact mapping

    Jesse
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:45 pm
    Recently Gavin and I were able to attend an Impact Mapping workshop run by Gojko Adzic. We got to spend the day trying out Impact Mapping and seeing how we can apply it to different situations. It’s an excellent tool, so we thought we would give you a run down on the basics and a couple of ways that you can apply it to your projects. What is Impact Mapping? Impact mapping allows us to link deliverables to high level business goals. By doing so we are able to understand the assumptions and motivations that underpin a user story and how each deliverable helps us move towards business…
  • The Board Episode 30

    Kirstin
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:25 pm
    In Episode 30 of The Board, we talk about: Defining velocity (as discussed in Mike Cohn’s blog) Signs you’re doing Agile wrong Related Posts: No Related Posts
  • The Board Episode 29

    Kirstin
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:12 pm
    In Episode 29 we talked about: The evils of multitasking Wikispeed kickstarter Business analyst role in Scrum Value stream mapping (a post by Alan Shalloway) Related Posts: No Related Posts
  • The Board – Episode 28 – Agile health checklist

    Kirstin
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:56 pm
    In Episode 28th of The Board we talk about a training day we recently ran and about our Agile health checklist: Related Posts: No Related Posts
  • The Board Episode 27 – MVP vs MMP and CITCON

    Kirstin
    31 Aug 2014 | 3:44 pm
    On episode 27 of The Board Gav and Paul talked about: Roman Pichler’s blog on Minimum Viable Product vs Minimum Marketable Product Paul’s experiences at CITCON (Continuous Integration and Testing conference) Related Posts: No Related Posts
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    Agile Ottawa

  • Agile Ottawa – September Event – Announcement and Links

    Caroline Sauve
    14 Sep 2014 | 1:20 pm
    Thanks to Phil Green (twitter: @pg5150) for his engaging workshop on “User Story Mapping” this week.  Thank you also to all who came out and participated in the event… we had a packed house and a great time. As promised, here are some … Continue reading →
  • Calling all Agilistas! Another Year of Agile Ottawa is Ready to Go!

    Caroline Sauve
    29 Aug 2014 | 5:07 pm
    The volunteer organizers of Agile Ottawa have been busy bees over the summer as we prepare for another year of Agile Ottawa meetup events.  In addition, our group is taking on a greater leadership role in organizing the Gatineau Ottawa Agile … Continue reading →
  • GOAT 2014 Call for Speakers – Appel aux conférenciers

    ellengrove
    12 Aug 2014 | 7:58 pm
    Gatineau Ottawa Agile Tour 2014 Call for Speakers The Gatineau  Ottawa Agile Tour (#GOAT14) is a one day conference around the theme of Agility applied to software development, management, marketing, product management and other areas of today’s businesses. This year’s event … Continue reading →
  • Software Methodologies Experiment – The Marshmallow Challenge

    sbourk
    26 May 2014 | 10:07 am
    This is a summary of this meetup held on May 13, 2014 at YouILab Ellen, Glenn and Caroline started the night with Agile 101s on different software methodologies. Once Glenn pulled out his outstanding explanation of Waterfall, Ellen made a … Continue reading →
  • Secrets of Agile Success – Minutes From Our “Success Faire”

    Caroline Sauve
    16 Feb 2014 | 11:04 am
    Once again, the Agile Ottawa community did not disappoint… The evening started with an engaging session on Core Protocols, facilitated by our own Ellen Grove.  Ellen covered the basics of Core Protocols and lead a very effective exercise where the … Continue reading →
 
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    Practical Agility

  • How to Enable Estimate-Free Development

    Dave Rooney
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:49 am
    Most of us have been there... the release or sprint planning meeting to goes on and on and on and on. There is constant discussion over what a story means and endless debate over whether it's 3, 5 or 8 points. You're eventually bludgeoned into agreement, or simply too numb to disagree. Any way you look at it, you'll never get those 2, 4 or even 6 hours back - they're gone forever! And to what
  • "How Thin is Thin?" An Example of Effective Story Slicing

    Dave Rooney
    24 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    Graphene is pure carbon in the form of a very thin, nearly transparent sheet, one atom thick. It is remarkably strong for  its very low weight and it conducts heat and electricity with great efficiency. Wikipedia If you have spent any time at all working in an Agile software development environment, you've heard the mantra to split your Stories as thin as you possibly can while still
  • An Appetite for Change

    Dave Rooney
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:25 am
    I've been part of a discussion on Twitter about the vices of imposed Agile adoptions versus the virtues of the approach put forth by Daniel Mezick, OpenAgile Adoption. Regardless of the arguments for or against each approach, creating this dichotomy misses the point. In May 2012, organizational change consultant Maureen Cunningham gave a talk at Agile Ottawa about Change. She used a number of
  • An Existence Proof and The Value of Coaching

    Dave Rooney
    12 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    I found a tweet I saw this morning rather disconcerting: An embedded #agile coach billing $2500 a day for 221 days can in theory generate this much per yr: $552,500. Q: What does the client get? — Daniel Mezick (@DanielMezick) August 12, 2014 The clear implication is that coaches, like all consultants, follow the mantra, "If you can't be part of the solution, there's plenty of money to be made
  • Agile Transformation Phase 2 - Get Real With Your Portfolio

    Dave Rooney
    21 Apr 2014 | 6:48 am
    If you're scanning my blog for "Phase 1", you will do so in vain! Phase 2 is a reference to the infamous "Underpants Gnomes" from South Park: In the case of an Agile transformation, Phase 1 is the good old pilot project. If all we coaches ever did was to assist with pilot projects, we'd be rock stars! Pilot projects are by definition set up for success. Mountains are moved in order to ensure
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    Agile Pain Relief

  • Agile Quick Links #22

    Heather
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:38 pm
    Some reading that Agile folk will be interested in: Flow Is For Sissies (Andrew Fuqua) Scrum: Tracking Impediments (James Rosko) Ready Column: Breaking Out Projects (Jim Benson) How Women Can Help Build Better Agile Teams (Pawel Brodzinski ) Why the Ideal Line Is a Slippery Slope – aka be careful of your Sprint Burndowns (Ram Srinivasan) Don’t Estimate Stories In Sprint Planning (Andrew Fuqua) Why your team should appoint a “meta-knowledge” champion  (Mell, J., van Knippenberg, D., & van Ginkel, W.) Done Column: How Does Your Work Make You Feel? (Jim Benson) We…
  • ScrumMaster Tales – Stuck Waiting for Other Teams

    Mark Levison
    29 Aug 2014 | 1:53 pm
    When a Scrum team finds their groove and become more efficient, everything will move along faster. Or… not? Sometimes the faster you’re able to go, the more speed bumps and stop signs you’ll encounter. John (ScrumMaster) and the team are humming along nicely building great new features for the SmallestOnlineBookStore. With the huge success of the first big release nine months ago, venture capital money has come flowing into the company. Significant investments have been made in Operations, Security, and Networking in addition to creating several new Development Teams.
  • GOAT14 – Call for Speakers

    Heather
    22 Aug 2014 | 6:41 am
    This year’s Gatineau Ottawa Agile Tour (#GOAT14) will take place on Monday, November 24th 2014, and Agile Pain Relief Consulting is once again a proud sponsor. Organizers are looking for engaging and inspirational speakers for this year’s conference. If you are interested in participating, please submit a proposal by completing the online form at http://confengine.com/gatineau-ottawa-agile-tour-2014. The organizing committee will select speakers based on the following criteria: Learning potential for and appeal to participants Practicality and usefulness/applicability of content to…
  • ScrumMaster Tales – The Trouble with Sprint Burndowns

    admin
    18 Jun 2014 | 9:11 pm
    It’s six Sprints after the “Overtime/Disastrous Release”, which set the team back by several months. During the current Sprint Planning, the Team committed to completing the following nine User Stories: Julia and Rob – are personas used by the BookStore Team to keep them focused on the needs of real users. Julia is a Frequent Book Buyer and Rob is Rookie or First Time Book Buyer. As Julia I want to be able buy a $10 gift card so that I can thank a fantastic client. Limitation – not delivered just generated – Size: 5 As Julia I want my newly purchased gift card sent by…
  • Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) in Vancouver—December 11-12

    Heather
    18 Jun 2014 | 10:28 am
    Agile Pain Relief presents a two-day Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) workshop in Vancouver—December 11-12 taught by certified ScrumMaster Trainer Mark Levison.
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    Agile Scout

  • Standard Faire – Par for the Course

    peter
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:10 am
    Dear Peter, In my current Job, we started a new project in January 2014 to build a strategic solution and completely replace an existing tactical system by end of 2014. Till date, which is September 2014 [emphasis mine], what has been done is a 50 pager BRD provided by business. This is the 1st project artifact that was provided to the technical team. Even after reading this 50 pager document, we could not understand the project requirement fully. Thanks and Regards, M.R. Why is this the norm? This dysfunction is far beyond reasonable, and far beyond rationale. It astounds me (but it…
  • Sunday Science [FUN]

    peter
    21 Sep 2014 | 5:15 am
    Man, this is so powerful. This stuff is actually happening in our bodies right now. The power… the grace… the amazing human. Sunday Science [FUN]
  • Who Broke the Build [Video] #lol

    peter
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:16 am
    Old… but still funny. To all my FLEX devs out there! Who Broke the Build [Video] #lol
  • The Story of Lazy

    peter
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:28 am
    There has to be some implications we can use beyond… the obvious message (idea) here… The Story of Lazy
  • Agile from the Techno-Weenie Perspective

    peter
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:15 am
    I am a geek through and through. My skillset is wrapped in system commands, database architecture, and servers big and small. I can quote Dr. Who and I know the question to Life, the Universe, and Everything.  My geek credentials are impressive. I am happiest in front of my laptop and things like gantt charts and project plans cause my eyes to roll back in my head. So why did I find myself sitting in an Agilescout Certified Scrumaster class in a sea of Project Managers? Well, I accidently discovered the simplicity and elegance of Scrum. Curious, I implemented it imperfectly in a very small…
 
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    QSM SLIM-Estimate blogs

  • Webinar - From Proposal to Project: Getting Resource Demand Early

    Elisabeth Pendergrass
    18 Sep 2014 | 10:41 am
    Registration is now open for QSM's upcoming webinar, From Proposal to Project: Getting Resource Demand Early, presented by Andy Berner and Keith Ciocco on Oct. 2 at 1:00 PM EDT.When evaluating proposals, any good project manager knows it doesn't do any good to charter a project if the right people aren't available or if the cost and schedule are unrealistic. It becomes very important early on in the proposal process to be able to run accurate feasibility estimates that produce skilled staff outputs, matching resources needed for a project to the resources you have. This webinar, presented by…
  • The Best of Both Worlds: Leveraging Top-Down Estimation with Capacity Planning

    Keith Ciocco
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:02 pm
    Since I work for a software metrics and estimation company, many people ask me questions regarding capacity planning and demand management. Most of the project managers that I speak with are using project portfolio management tools for very detailed, task-level resource capacity planning. They spend a lot of time planning the person hours for each task and then these task-level plans are prioritized and viewed across the organization. These are useful tools and methods and they usually require a sizable investment.The problem is that many of these project managers don’t have a good way to…
  • The Importance of Grooming the Backlog: An Interview with Andy Berner

    Elisabeth Pendergrass
    27 Aug 2014 | 12:59 pm
    In agile development, getting the backlog ready and grooming it take serious consideration and work. You need to plan, budget for, and track this work. In a recent interview with Cameron Philipp-Edmonds of StickyMinds, Andy Berner talks about his upcoming presentation for Agile Development Conference East, the importance of keeping a well-groomed backlog, the pitfalls of the impossible zone, and why it's vital that you and your team keep your tools serving you and not the other way around.Read the full interview transcript here!
  • 7 Reasons Why Use of Parametric Software Estimation is a No-Brainer

    Joe Madden
    21 Aug 2014 | 10:35 am
    Client organizations who are considering investing in SLIM (a top-down, scope-based, parametric software estimation tool) often ask us for return on investment (ROI) case study examples which we gladly provide to help them with their business case. However, one question that has never been asked but I have always wondered is: does ROI accelerate with increased investment or does it follow the law of diminishing returns?To answer this question, we looked at seven software estimation ROI case studies that included a variety of small, medium and large clients, from a single seat of SLIM all the…
  • New Article: A Case Study in Implementing Agile

    Elisabeth Pendergrass
    12 Aug 2014 | 11:18 am
    This case study for Agile Connection by QSM's Taylor Putnam serves as an example of how adopting agile can be extremely beneficial to an organization, as long as situational factors are considered. Adopting a new development method is a strategic, long-term investment rather than a quick fix. As this article shows, making deliberate, fully formed decisions will ultimately lead to better outcomes.Read the full article!
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    Agile World

  • What is Loyalty ?

    Venkatesh Krishnamurthy
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:07 am
    No one plans to fall sick isn't it? Similarly, when I caught some flu couple of years ago, we were eager to see a doctor. Being new to our suburb, googled around to find a nearby medical center. Took an appointment with "any available GP," visited and got better. After some time, it was my wife's turn. When she wasn't keeping well, she too called the medical center, took an appointment with "any available GP" and felt better. Apparently she visited a different GP than mine. She recommended me to see him next. Over the course of time, we noted his name and started getting appointment…
  • Increase speed by incentives and sacrifice quality

    Venkatesh Krishnamurthy
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:29 am
    Recently  I read an article in the news paper about improving the speed of passport delivery to citizens.  This is the news published in Times of India. It seems that passports are getting delayed as the police verification is taking a lot of time. In order to improve the speed, the passport office is planning to incentivize the police.  That is, if  the police completes their verification within 21 days, then would get more money else they are penalized by reducing the incentive.  I felt that this is one of the most dumbest idea ever implemented !! Here is the quote…
  • Your understanding of Kaizen is wrong

    Venkatesh Krishnamurthy
    13 Sep 2014 | 9:56 pm
    Kaizen is popularly associated with continuous learning or continuous improvement.  However, where people get wrong is who should continuously improve ?  Most Agilists and Leanists use Kaizen in the context of team improvement. That is, an agile team should continuously improve, and thus excluding the managers/leaders, rest of the company.  This is exactly where the understanding goes wrong.   The true Kaizen involves continuous improvement across the organization starting from the CxOs, and involving HR department, Finance, PMOs, Sales and marketing. It is also about…
  • Secret recipe for building self organizing teams

    Venkatesh Krishnamurthy
    31 Aug 2014 | 2:14 am
    I authored this short post for as part of Agile chronicles. Some time back I noticed something odd with an agile team. Team temperature used to be 10 out of 10, and each team member expressed their happiness working on this project.  I was curious to find the secret behind an “always happy team.” A bit of interaction with the team and the ScrumMaster revealed some disturbing secrets.  Here are the key ones: The team is self-organizing, and individuals can pick the story of their choice and deliver at their discretion!! Team has neither time pressure nor delivery timelines I…
  • Measuring Business value in Agile projects

    Venkatesh Krishnamurthy
    23 Aug 2014 | 2:20 am
    Because the first principle of the Agile Manifesto talks about delivering valuable software to the customer, many agile practitioners are constantly thoughtful of the value in each step of the software-development lifecycle. At the thirty-thousand-foot level, value creation starts with gathering requirements and continues with backlog creation, backlog grooming, writing user stories, and development, finally ending with integration, deployment, and support. Even with knowledge of all these moving parts, it is common to see organizations only measuring value during development and ignoring the…
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